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Northern Kentucky Family Law Blog

The correlation between Trump and divorce

Kentucky residents may be interested to hear that President Trump is playing a role in some couples' decisions to end their relationship. According to polling firm Wakefield Research, 10 percent of couples surveyed said that they were divorcing or breaking up because of their differing political views. Millennials were divorcing or breaking up at a rate of 22 percent because of that reason.

Furthermore, 22 percent of the 1,000 participants said that they knew of a marriage or relationship that was negatively impacted by Trump's election. A divorce attorney agreed with the results of the survey, and she says that such disagreements may stem from narcissism or obsessive compulsive disorder. Essentially, individuals believe that their partners must agree with them when it comes to their political or worldview to be in a successful relationship.

What to do if a person is falsely accused of child abuse

As Kentucky residents are becoming more aware about child abuse, more reports are being made. While some of these reports are substantiated, there are many others that involve accusations that are simply not true. Although these reports are often made in good faith, the allegations can be particularly harmful and even result in a loss of custody. If a person finds that they are being accused of child abuse, there are certain things they should and should not do.

Adults should avoid putting themselves into situations that may result in false allegations. For example, they should have another adult present with them if they are taking care of kids. If false allegations are levied, parents should do their best to maintain relationships with their children that are as positive as possible. This is because children are usually not responsible for these false accusations.

Dealing with family vacations when parents are not together

Kentucky parents who decide to divorce may have to learn how to share time with the children. While this may be easier to do during the school year, vacation times may be contentious if both parents want to spend time with the children. However, there are ways that parents can work out an agreement that allows the kids to go on family trips.

In many cases, the custody order will determine how the different school breaks are handled. If the parents do not have a custody order or the parents wish to work something out that the custody order does not include, handling the issue early is best. The parent who is planning the family trip should have the plan fully written out for the other parent. If the other parent causes problems, having the written document may help the parent petition the court for relief.

The problem with pets in a divorce

At different times in people's lives, they may develop a relationship with a furry friend that affects them deeply. Sometimes this happens in childhood, and other times later in life. Something about that bond with a dog, cat or other creature makes the hard times more bearable and the good times even better.

If you acquired your current pet during the years you were married, it may be difficult for you and your spouse to agree on where the animal will eventually end up after your divorce. You may be heartbroken that your divorce may cause your beloved friend confusion and anxiety.

What you should know about the USFSPA and how it affects divorce

Military and civilian divorces share common ground that includes child support, child custody, alimony, property division and other aspects of marital dissolution. However, marriages ending where one spouse is serving in a branch of the military present unique and significant complexities.

The length of a marriage during a military career determines eligibility for various benefits. Although some states have special provisions, jurisdiction becomes a factor when frequent moves make meeting residency requirements difficult.

The era of equal parenting time in Kentucky

Last week, the state of Kentucky did what many parents fail to do: look out for the best interests of children during the divorce process. In addition to tasty treats, young people found something else in their Easter baskets. While not expected, it was equally sweet. Kentucky children now have a better chance to see both of their parents after divorce.

Where parents once fought tooth and nail to “win” their children, those kids are now winning by default.

The custody battle is yours to lose

If you and your spouse are facing a contentious divorce, you may have serious concerns about the outcome of your situation. While your fair share of asset division is important for your future, your primary concern may be for the custody of your children. The presumption that the mother automatically gets custody is fading into the past, and fathers are winning primary custody in about half of all divorces that involve children.

As a result, parents can no longer make assumptions about the way a custody hearing will turn out. In the time leading up to your court date, you will want to be especially careful to avoid any behavior that might have a negative influence on your petition.

Litigate or collaborate: two ways to divide marital property

Like most people heading toward a divorce, you probably never expected to be in this place. It is likely a time of conflicting emotions and a great deal of stress. Beyond the emotions, however, you may also have practical thoughts about what life will be like after your marriage has ended.

Specifically, you may be thinking about what happens to everything you and your spouse have accumulated over the years. You might be wondering what you'll get to keep and what you'll have to give up. This article might help clear up some of the mystery surrounding property division in Kentucky.

When parents fight during divorce, kids suffer

The process of dissolving a marriage can be stressful and daunting. You may have heightened emotions during this period, and making decisions that are advantageous to your future can be challenging. These feelings can lead you to say and/or do things that can create a hostile environment during negotiations. Emotional decisions can be detrimental to the outcome of a divorce, but the negating of any financial losses may be possible in time. However, if you and your spouse have children together, a similar situation can cause them to suffer irreparable harm.

Establishing paternity and knowing your rights if you're deployed

The challenges a deployment present a soldier depend heavily on that soldier's situation. Take for example a soldier, recently divorced or separated from their child's other parent. For an individual in this situation, challenges can go beyond missing time with a child. A deployment can also mean missing important court dates or not being able to address court actions when needed.

In a situation such as this, it's easy to see why a soldier might have concerns about their parental rights, especially if paternity has yet to be established. In many cases, soldiers are unaware of the powerful protections they have under the law, particularly in child custody cases. In this post, we'd like to point out the protections afforded to soldiers with paternity issues.

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